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Choosing a Bitch for Dog Breeding 

  THE majority of those who commence breeding dogs in a small way start out with one bitch, and working from there gradually enlarge their kennels. So let us start from the beginning, with one bitch.

  How does one go about choosing his first bitch? As a rule, more factors enter into this choice than any subsequent one, for in many cases the beginner is looking for a pet as well as a bitch that he can show or use as the foundation of his kennel. And there is another factor which does not enter into later purchases—the question of what breed to start with.

  For me to offer any advice as to the breed would be a waste of time. Every dog lover has his own favorite, and that is the breed with which to start his kennel. If you are an admirer of Labrador retrievers, it would be the height of bad judgment to start breeding Pekinese, just as it would be foolish to commence with cocker spaniels simply because they are popular, if your admiration centers on schipperkes. Breed the dogs you love best if you want to get the most satisfaction from your efforts. Of course, if you love St. Bernards but must live in a city, perhaps you will have to find a second love among the smaller breeds!

  As a general rule, a bitch makes a better house pet than a dog. She has all his good points and fewer of his faults; she is more gentle and at the same time more vigilant. Possibly it is the mother instinct of her sex coming out, but she is more demonstrative in her affection, and she gives visitors to the house a more thorough scrutiny to distinguish between the desirable and the undesirable. She also takes more pride in keeping her home clean, and is easier to housebreak than a male. A bitch is usually more domesticated and is less likely to be the cause of neighborhood feuds through the desecration of lawns or flower beds. She is also a better companion for children, for she is more sensitive to the presence of danger.

  I know that the prospective breeder does not need to be convinced of the good points of a bitch, but these advantages may serve as answers to the buyers who demand a dog and turn in disdain from a bitch. With the exception of the two heats through which the bitch passes each year, she is much less trouble than the male, for he is in heat all the time! If your prospective buyer wants to use his purchase as a working or hunting dog, you can assure him that a bitch is easier to train and can take on the same duties and perform them just as well as the male.

  If your bitch is to be kept in the house, by all means look to the points which go to make a good pet; but if you are starting a kennel, never lose sight of the fact that these are secondary considerations.
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